Posts Tagged ‘Liberal Party’

To listen and to learn in Ottawa.

Sunday, November 8th, 2020

Yesterday it was noted how quiet the Ottawa scene has been while history is made in America.

But we ignore Ottawa at our peril. You have to listen to buzz in the quiet. There is the testiness of the conservative caucus—planning for the partisan attacks to come. There is the disquiet of the new democrats hoping to build a new future. There is the hope for new leadership and new challenges among the greens. And the bloc MPs share their hopes for a future, no sitting bloc member can expect to see.

It is the nervous energy of the liberal caucus that spins Canada’s immediate future. Do they sit quietly in the balcony watching the high jinks of the country below or is there serious thought of the road ahead for their party, their leadership and their country??

Do they realize the crossroads where their country is at? Do they see the changes that move like the world’s tectonic plates?

Do they see the damage that Justin Trudeau has done to the once-strong liberal party? Is the liberal list of registered liberals just Trudeau’s handy ATM? And whose electoral district do you represent? Is it your riding, or Justin’s?

As a member of parliament, who do you represent? Is it the riding or the liberal party? Who do you speak for in parliament? Your political masters in the PMO? Or Canadians? And are you financially independent for the next election? Are you allowed to think or are you just a rubber stamp for the PMO?

And speaking of the PMO, is that collection of sycophants capable of keeping the prime minister out of trouble? Do you realize the naiveté of your leader? He learned so little at his father’s knee.

So, let’s give a passing thought to our MP’s. We will soon be seeing them at the hustings.

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Copyright 2020 © Peter Lowry

Complaints, comments, criticisms and compliments can be sent to  peter@lowry.me

Don’t blame Singh.

Sunday, October 25th, 2020

If there was ever a guy on the wrong side of the parliamentary ledger, it is Jagmeet Singh of the new democrats. While the rest of the opposition thought they were driving more nails into liberal coffins, this week, there was Jagmeet and the NDP caucus keeping their word and supporting the liberals.

Singh and his losers in the NDP knew what this support was costing them. They stopped an election that Canadians did not want at this time but there is no reward for their keeping their word or their honesty.

And when the election does take place, it will likely be Jagmeet’s last as leader of the new democrats. There will be no reward from the voters for keeping his word. Whether the next election is next week or next year, Jagmeet’s tenure in office is on a short string.

The only time that the NDP improved their position in trashing a minority government was under Jack Layton in 2006. They might have gained a few seats in parliament at the time because of the liberal sponsorship scandal. The new democrats’ lack of support, at that time, for the Paul Martin government, also helped open the door to Stephen Harper’s ten years as prime minister of Canada.

It might be a very different situation for Singh and the liberals if tomorrow or a few months from now he and his caucus support another motion of non-confidence. The reality is that the public does not see the WE scandal in the same way as the Quebec-based sponsorship scandal.

Also, a lot of Canadians admired Justin Trudeau for his cuckoo-like popping in and out of the Rideau Cottage throughout the pandemic ups and downs of 2020. They felt a kinship with him that could transcend the usual political relationships. He and his party could see an edge there that the opposition were not recognizing. The liberals were willing to bet on it.

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Copyright 2020 © Peter Lowry

Complaints, comments, criticisms and compliments can be sent to  peter@lowry.me

“I double dare you.”

Wednesday, October 21st, 2020

The kids are bruising for a fight but unsure of the outcome. The Ottawa liberals are tantalizing the conservatives with the prospect of an election. The only problem is that it could all be for nothing. If nobody can win, what is the point?

And that is the real problem. No matter how you read the polls, there is no other likely outcome to an election than what already exists today. The only logical outcome is a few seats this way or a few seats that way. If you cannot win, why do it?

And that is the question. The conservatives are trying to corner the liberals with corruption charges which have little real support from the voters. It is an attempt to oversize the We scandal.

What the conservatives do not realize is that the We charity is a dead issue. The voters have much more serious questions to think about. The covid-19 figures keep growing and all the voters want is a vaccine. They want a Halloween to enjoy for their kids. They want us all to have a Merry Christmas. They want life in Canada to get back to normal. Then they will have time to listen to politicians who might or might not know what they are doing.

But, at this time, the conservatives only have their new leader in the crosshairs. Erin O’Toole can ill-afford an election. His problems are the attack dogs such as conservative Pierre Poilievre from Ottawa. They are undermining O’Toole’s ideas for a kinder, gentler conservative party and dragging him into a fight that he does not need.

But never fear folks, Jagmeet Singh and his sorry new democrats will come to the rescue. They can hardly afford an election either.

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Copyright 2020 © Peter Lowry

Complaints, comments, criticisms and compliments can be sent to  peter@lowry.me

The unindicted Bill Blair.

Tuesday, October 20th, 2020

It took them a long time to start to redress the wrong and they still have not got it right. Here it is ten years down the road and the only people we are confident are being compensated to date are the lawyers. The G20 summit in Toronto in 2010 has often been described as “the most massive compromise of civil liberties in Canadian history.”

And the man in charge at the time is now Canada’s minister of public safety and emergency preparedness. It is a travesty that the person in charge can pass the responsibility to underlings and escape blame for his failure to properly direct his police.

With the already largest municipal police force in Canada, Blair’s police were augmented by federal, provincial and municipal forces from across Canada. It was this massive force that stood off and allowed rampant destruction in downtown Toronto. Fools and anarchists ran amok smashing store windows and burning police cars. In the end, it was mainly innocent bystanders and gawkers who paid the price of illegal detainment, search and incarceration.

The illegal kettling of innocent bystanders the next day was in retribution for what the police had allowed downtown the day before.

And where the hell was Toronto police chief Bill Blair? While he later acknowledged to the citizens of Toronto that the actions of his officers were his responsibility, Blair has never apologized for his failure to act for Torontonians on their behalf.

The G20 that summer weekend will go down in Canadian history in unison with the Winnipeg General Strike as an egregious breach of the rights of Canadians.

Many Canadians would like to know why Justin Trudeau has chosen Blair for election as a liberal MP and for positions at the cabinet table?

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Copyright 2020 © Peter Lowry

Complaints, comments, criticisms and compliments can be sent to  peter@lowry.me

This fails the smell test.

Friday, September 11th, 2020

It must have been the final political straw for Bill Morneau. After taking some of the heat off the prime minister in the ‘We charity’ imbroglio, the former finance minister is still being criticized for his naiveté. Not only is he being pilloried by the opposition in parliament and ridiculed by the news media, he is being charged with violating the elections act during last year’s election.

This is an inexcusable situation. Bill Morneau was just one more of Justin Trudeau’s elite choices for a key role in his cabinet. As a lamb to the slaughter, he deserved better. Trudeau used him and tossed him away when he was no longer useful.

The Morneau name meant more in the Toronto business community. It was also useful to have the connection with his wife’s family, the Florenceville, New Brunswick McCain’s.

But when you bring someone into politics like Morneau, you can hardly expect him to be flying solo as soon as his new political career is launched. This guy needed ongoing help and guidance and Trudeau and the prime minister’s office let him down. Morneau needed something more than a service dog to keep him out of trouble.

He needed one or two experienced people in that office to help keep him from the gaffs he made because of his lack of political experience.

But if Trudeau did not think he needed that kind of help, why should he expect his underlings to need it?

Looking at his staff working with him in 2015 election, was disquieting. There were actually two people working with him whom I was aware had as much or more political experience as Justin Trudeau. And one of them had to quit because of a conflict.

Trudeau had gotten rid of the old liberal party workhorses in the Senate and ignored the experienced people out in the ridings. He was running his own campaign. And, as luck had it, that was also what the Canadian voters wanted.

But, how often are you that lucky?

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Copyright 2020 © Peter Lowry

Complaints, comments, criticisms and compliments can be sent to  peter@lowry.me

Doing what they do best.

Wednesday, September 9th, 2020

It is time for the conservatives in parliament to return to what they do best: criticize. They are so good at it that they have more people lined up to criticize the liberal cabinet members than there are liberal cabinet members to criticize.

It would be easy to just give you a list but it is important to note that only five of the positions seem important. Obviously, the leader of the opposition gets to criticize the prime minister most of the time. And then you get that nasty Pierre Poilievre taking on the finance minister and deputy prime minister.

The surprise pick was our old nemesis, former conservative leader, Andrew Scheer, who will criticize the liberal infrastructure plan that the liberals promised Canadians.

Because of the importance of health in this time of a pandemic, Alberta MP Michelle Rempel Garner will cover that portfolio.

Another choice that caught us off guard, was Ontario MP Michael Chong as foreign affairs critic. Chong has often been a critic of his own party for its failure to develop policies more in tune with how Canadians are thinking. It will be interesting to see how Chong handles the job.

If there was one standard complaint about Canadian conservatives over the years, is that you always know where they stand. They tend to be knee-jerk reactionaries, with little thinking of benefit to the average Canadian in mind.

What will be uppermost on the conservative mind will be the supposed deficit that Canadians will be faced with for years to come because of the supposedly wanton spending of the liberals. This is basic conservative cant and at to-day’s interest rates, inflation will save us more than we are likely to have to repay.

If the conservatives were really sincere about paying off some of this debt, maybe they would agree to replacing the two-per cent cut that Stephen Harper took from the HST. That would be a good place to find some money in a recovering economy.

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Copyright 2020 © Peter Lowry

Complaints, comments, criticisms and compliments can be sent to  peter@lowry.me

So, who wants an election?

Monday, September 7th, 2020

Americans do it every four years. Canadians sometimes do it more often. We are talking about federal elections here. Americans have never seen one like this one: the vote seems all locked down two months before the actual election. Given that intention and the determination of the voters, Donald Trump should be out on his ass in just two months.

There is a ‘maybe’ in that statement. It takes almost three months for the transition from one president to the next anyway. And what if Trump baulks? He likes being president. What happens if all his supporters do vote twice?

And what happens in Canada if the liberals and conservatives have a tie? Do we have to settle for the prime minister the Bloc, the NDP and the greens choose?

Maybe in Canada we have to wait and see what Justin Trudeau’s liberals have in mind on which to spend money. One thing for sure, the conservatives have never saved us much, as they seem to like giving all the tax breaks to their rich friends.

The rule of thumb is that you never worry about how much a government wants to spend until they scare the bond rating services. The opposition are just fear-mongering.

Many people are looking forward to just how green this new liberal program will be. It will hardly matter though if Trudeau does not dump the TransMountain pipeline that is being twinned to carry three times the amount of oil sands bitumen over the Rockies.

The one thing for sure is that there will be much sabre rattling about an election on both sides of the Canada-U.S. border until we hear this new liberal plan.

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Copyright 2020 © Peter Lowry

Complaints, comments, criticisms and compliments can be sent to  peter@lowry.me

Tooling along with O’Toole.

Wednesday, September 2nd, 2020

It is ‘go easy’ time on the new leader of Canada’s conservatives. Erin O’Toole is getting the easy ride ahead of any election. The media are throwing him the soft lobs to try to give them some of the thought processes he will be using for tougher questions during a campaign.

It is an amusing thought that the media are crediting him with the supposedly brilliant strategy that propelled him past Peter MacKay to win. What is brilliant about a strategy that says you need to come second to everyone else? That was his strategy and he stuck to it.

It is damn lucky for Canada’s conservatives that Canada does not use a foolish multiple-choice voting system for our national elections. We would end up with a new democrat or green government if we did that.

You would think that our conservatives would stop using multiple choice systems now that they have experienced the same type of result each time. First time, they got ‘Chuckles’ Scheer. Now they get a Tool,

This is just what Canada’s social conservatives wanted to hear—just how liberal O’Toole is about abortions and same sex marriage. This guy is going to get strung up by his own supporters. These social conservatives are the people who put him in their party’s driver’s seat.

This guy is going to have to think long and heard before pushing Justin Trudeau into a fall election. In fact, he might even have to think some more about what would happen in an election next year.

O’Toole is going to have to use more than just the occasional gaff by the liberal leader as his springboard to an election.

Trudeau won a lot of kudos for his handling of the pandemic with those cuckoo clock presentations out of Rideau Cottage. He has a lot of electoral muscle left with women, youth and urban voters. If he can get rid of the TransMountain pipeline albatross, he has clear sailing.

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Copyright 2020 © Peter Lowry

Complaints, comments, criticisms and compliments can be sent to  peter@lowry.me

A sharp turn to the left?

Sunday, August 30th, 2020

Bloomberg News must be concerned. The business news people are reporting, that under the new management of Justin Trudeau and Chrystia Freeland, Canada’s economy will take a decisive lurch to the left. The only delaying factor that might have held up that lurch was obviously Bill Morneau, whom Freeland replaced as finance minister.

Bloomberg now considers Ms. Freeland firmly established as the prime minister’s most trusted lieutenant and “Ms. Fix-It.” They are betting that Canada’s economy will be ‘equitable and green’ under the new finance minister.

As much as I hate to rain on Ms. Freeland’s parade, it is not all that simple. The major stumbling point is that Goddamn TransMountain pipeline. Exactly how many billions the prime minister is willing to spend on that abomination has yet to be determined. There is certainly nothing green or equitable about that!

Freeland has to recognize that negotiating with that scuzzball Jason Kenney in Alberta is a no-win situation. That guy would hate Trudeau even if he adopted him and made him his heir.

There will be many challenges flung at Ms. Freeland in her new position. The least of these challenges will be as to her qualifications for the job. The writing of Plutocrats in 2012 might just be considered envy rather than credentials.

Nor should we be so quick to laud her negotiations with the Trump regime in the United States over the new NAFTA rules. You just do what you should always do with a bully: walk around him.

I figure that there are two jobs for Ms. Freeland. Number one is to get us through this pandemic. Number two is to set this nation on a path that pulls our country together and united. Canada has much to accomplish in the years ahead. Let us do it together.

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Copyright 2020 © Peter Lowry

Complaints, comments, criticisms and compliments can be sent to  peter@lowry.me

Justin’s ‘Turn to Bow’.

Friday, July 31st, 2020

Yesterday’s show from Ottawa reminded me of a small book produced by Maclean’s magazine for the 1972 federal election: Their turn to curtsy – Your turn to bow. It told you all the magazine thought you needed to know to be a knowledgeable voter. Maybe that was the intent of the latest episode of the finance committee hearings.

As usual, the Zoom technology proved its strengths and weaknesses. It is dependent on the individual participant’s Internet service—and that is a mixed bag across the country. Mind you the different ‘sets’ for each of the politicians also told a story. I felt sorry for liberal MP Julie Dzerowicz. We know the cost of real estate in Toronto is horrendous but the poor girl looked like she was in somebody’s closet.

New democrat Charley Angus’ background was the clutter of a mind occupied with other things. Yet, conservative Pierre Poilievre was regally presented with a perfectly lit set (until his back flood failed) and full make-up. Chairman Wayne Easter, MP from Prince Edward Island, had a power failure during a storm and it looked like Pierre Poilievre, deputy chair, would take over. Luckily, the power came back quickly in Malpeque.

Whomever set up the studious office setting for the prime minister should have demanded his subject get a shave and a haircut. Maybe he kept the beard because it aged him but the hair looked like a four-year old who screamed when taken to a barber. And not having a teleprompter for his opening remarks was a mistake.

But some would argue that what was said was most important. You could only wish something new was said. As one of the most experienced politicians, the NDP’s Charlie Angus used the ‘more in sorrow than in anger’ approach and it earned him a lecture from the PM who was probably among the least experienced.

The people who needed better balance were the conservatives. Michael Barrett, the newby from Leeds-Grenville-Thousand Islands and Rideau Lakes was trying to out-nasty Pierre Poilievre. His angle of attack was whether the PM would fire the civil servants who where supposed to vet the WE charity.

Like the book from Maclean’s, I am not sure I ever read the entire content. You had to be a political person to really stick with the drama yesterday. Will it matter? Not much. Will finance minister Bill Morneau be fired? I think he should be.

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Copyright 2020 © Peter Lowry

Complaints, comments, criticisms and compliments can be sent to  peter@lowry.me